Anime Reel – Anime & Manga TV News

Posts Tagged ‘RIP

Yume Miru Kikai, Kon Satoshi's new movie.

Edit: Satoshi Kon’s birthday is October 12, so technically he died at age 46. The Japanese sources said he was alive for 47 years, which isn’t quite the same.

An otherwise sleepy night in Japan has been interrupted by the rippling news that Satoshi Kon (technically, Kon Satoshi, but I’ve known him as Satoshi Kon for so long that it’s hard to go back to Japanese name order) passed away suddenly at the age of 46. In spite of the early hour – it’s 2 AM on the 25th in Japan right now – anime fans on social networking site Mixi and industry luminaries like Takeda Yasuhiro have expressed their sorrow at the loss of such a well-respected creator. More and more confirmations are coming in, with the head of Madhouse (via Jim Vowles of Otakon) stating that his company has lost a very important director. No cause of death has been given.

Satoshi Kon burst onto the scene with his psychological thriller Perfect Blue in 1998, and made a reputation for surreal and beautiful movies, with Millenium Actress and Paranoia Agent making strong impressions on international audiences. He was working on The Dream Machine (Yume Miru Kikai) at the time of his death, and no word has yet come on what will happen to the movie’s slated 2011 release.

RIP, good sir. I should go watch the Magnetic Rose segment of Memories again, to remind myself of just how much talent the anime world has just lost.

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You know, Rick Hunter really isn't a bad name. Certainly easier to say than Hikaru Ichijou for a 6-year-old.

Happy trails.

Sad news hit the anime community last night. Streamline Pictures co-founder Carl Macek passed away on Saturday following a heart attack. He was best known as the producer of Robotech, and was also a script writer for the English adaptations of such anime as My Neighbor Totoro, The Castle of Cagliostro, Naruto, and Bleach. He was 58 years old.

Carl Macek was a controversial figure in the anime fan community for decades, known both as a skillful storyteller who managed to weave three disparate anime (Macross, Southern Cross, and Mospeada) into a fairly cohesive whole and a hack who butchered Captain Harlock and Queen Milennia into an incoherent mess. Regardless of where you stand on the matter, the fact is that he was responsible for two generations of kids learning to love anime, and for that, he will be missed.

I had the pleasure of meeting Carl at AOD 2010 a couple of months ago, and he was a gracious guest with the soul of a storyteller. I was very impressed by his knowledge and his willingness to share it, and all of us on staff looked forward to hearing more tales from behind the scenes of all the anime we loved as kids. We’ll never hear them now, and we’re all sadder for it.

Rest well, old man.

(edit: Carl Macek was born in 1951, making him 58 years old at time of death and not 51.)


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